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Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 1:57:00 PM EDT

I'd been chopping for a while before I discovered Clipping Masks even existed. Now I don't know what I ever did without them.

In this Beginner's Tutorial I'll show you a few ways to apply this great Photoshop feature.

STEP 1: THE BASICS

Open a new PSD with a white background.
Create a new layer (the new layer bit is important) and then using the Elliptical Marquee Tool make a circle.
TIP: Holding down the 'shift' key will create a perfect circle.
Then fill your circle with red, like this:



[Edited by User on 9/10/2012 11:01:58 AM]

Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 2:03:38 PM EDT

Now we're going to use Clipping Masks to give the circle a 3D effect.

With your red circle layer selected, go to the 'Layer' dropdown along the top of your screen, select Layer/New/Layer and then click the box "Use Previous Layer to Create Clipping Mask".



Your layers palette will now look like this:


[Edited by User on 8/30/2012 4:19:31 PM]

Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 2:15:10 PM EDT

Using your Colour Picker tool, select a colour in the same range as your red circle but much darker, like this:




With the new clipping mask layer selected, paint with a large soft brush on the bottom left side of your circle to create a shadow. See how the paint is only applied where there are pixels on the layer below? No need to try and stay inside the lines!


Now go to your red circle layer and create another clipping mask layer. Your layers palette will look like this:



Again using the Colour Picker in the red range choose a colour that's almost white. Paint highlights on the second clipping mask layer at the top right of the circle.

The edges will be a bit sharp so using a large, soft eraser set at about 8% opacity, soften the edges of both your light and dark clipping mask layers. You'll end up with something like this:


[Edited by User on 8/31/2012 8:38:27 AM]

Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 2:26:53 PM EDT

Now you can paint a shadow on a layer under your shiny red ball and maybe add a gradient to the background and voila...


Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 2:51:39 PM EDT

STEP 2: TEXTURES

You can also use Clipping Masks to add texture to objects. This is a great method to use for Worth contests like "Sand Castles" and "Alternate Materials: Wood".

Lets go back to our PSD with just the plain red circle.

Drag in a texture, like this one, on top of your red circle layer.


We'll now turn this texture into a Clipping Mask so that it only shows over the red circle layer below. To do this go to your layers dropdown and select 'Layer/Create Clipping Mask" (or you can use keyboard shortcut Alt+Ctrl+G)



Your texture is now clipped over your circle layer


and your layers palette looks like this:


[Edited by User on 8/30/2012 3:24:29 PM]

Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 3:03:58 PM EDT

We can now use the Warp tool to make the circle look three dimensional.

With your texture clipping mask layer selected, Go to Edit/Transform/Warp. You'll see this grid over your layer:


Move the dots inwards towards your circle and play around until the pattern is warped around it in the shape of a ball.





[Edited by User on 8/31/2012 8:31:42 AM]

Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 3:11:08 PM EDT

That kinda looks like a planet to me, so let's go with that. Drag in a spacey background:


Now we can add light and shadow to our planet using the same steps we used at the beginning of this tuturial on the red ball.

Create a clipping mask over the texture layer and paint a dark colour over the bottom left. Create another clipping mask layer and paint a light colour over the top right. Your layers palette will now look like this:


And your quickie space scene like this:


[Edited by User on 8/30/2012 4:40:53 PM]

Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 3:35:36 PM EDT

STEP 3: TEXT

Clipping Masks can also be used to add some fun to your text.

Here I've created a new PSD with a type layer:



Drag in a texture layer on top of the type layer, like this one:



Now make that brick layer a Clipping Mask (Alt+Ctrl+G or Layer/Create Clipping Mask)

Your layers palette will now look like this:



And your type like this:


[Edited by User on 8/30/2012 4:50:19 PM]

Arena ModeratorShorra said 2 years ago 8/30/2012 3:56:24 PM EDT

Add more to it by borrowing our planet texture and putting it in the background.

Add a drop shadow to the type layer.

Then using the same method as the previous two steps, give your letters some depth by adding dark and light clipping mask layers. Your layers palette will look like this:



And your final image like this:



Experiment with using Clipping Masks to add shadows and highlights to all the added elements in your chops. It's a great way to make your photomanipulations look more realistic.


[Edited by User on 8/31/2012 8:34:45 AM]

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